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2018, TRENDS, DIRECTIONS & WHY LESS IS THE NEW MORE

Thursday, March 22nd 2018 by

“I have yet to see a house that lacked sufficient storage. The real problem is that we have far more than we need or want”.  Marie Kondo New York times best-selling book, The Life Changing Magic Of Tidying Up is a part of the trend sweeping the world towards the minimal life. A life of less consumption and more meaningful purchase, one that has people seeking the “less is more” lifestyle.

When less is more it’s the details like quality and personalised experience that count, buyers are seeking both long lasting aesthetic and functionality in addition to style. With this in mind, we have put together three distinct on-trend themes for 2018 in form, furniture and shape that will last the distance and bring you on trend looks with timeless qualities.

Convex Corners

The evolution of space has come full circle. That’s right, 2018 is all about rounded shapes. Taking the edge off sharp forms and rigid lines, the curvier new forms are a soft and inviting contrast to the geometric, sharp lines of times past. Understated and inviting, with cues from era’s such as art deco and mid-century architecture, the curvaceous lines, soft edges and sculpted frames of furniture invites us to use fabric and colour to enhance our spaces.

Further, soften your spaces aesthetically with accessories like cushions and ottomans in velvets and creamy pastel hues. This is the perfect style direction for those wanting to create a warm and relaxed space without skipping on style.

Source of inspirational images (clockwise from top left): Five Pouf, Mathilda chair, Osso chair, banquet seating, Acapulco collection, Kaleidoscope collection

 

Relaxed Haven

As the world outside gets more and more hectic, our private spaces matter more. There is a need to create calming, nest-like havens in our homes. A more relaxed style direction means we are seeing softer fabrics on our armchairs and sofas, and daybeds in our windows. Large pillows, soft edges and tactile fabrics to sink into. Accessories like throws, rugs and cushions take centre stage with comfort being the focus.

Coupled with this look, natural materials such as linen, cotton, seagrass, bamboo and wood advocate living a more sustainable life. The overall outcome is a sense of serenity that is both enticing and restful.

This inviting look can also be achieved with tone-on-tone colours and subdued hues, broken up with patterns that incorporate natural elements. Pattern styles complimentary to this aesthetic are influenced by global prints and dyeing techniques – aged and weathered materials that provide a sense of familiarity and comfort.

Urban or coastal, small or large, this relaxed style can be applied to your favourite sunny nook or your entire space.

Source of inspirational images (clockwise from top left): Haven collection, The Bedhead Co, Dulux, Coast collection, Nobu collection

Element Fusion

Gone are the days of matching furniture, fabrics and accessories. With the ability to change and adapt your space over time, the focus has shifted from what matches to items that fit personal taste and can be mixed and matched to create your own unique signature style.

It’s not just good looks that count, it is a full sensory experience that bring new dimensions to classic looks. This opens up the opportunity to gain a depth within your space; hard and soft edges paired together, linen and wool, cotton and bamboo, metals and wood. Coupled with statement colours and vintage materials you can create nooks and areas that can be redeveloped over and over by moving and mixing your pieces and introducing new fabrics from time to time.

This is the perfect approach for people looking to achieve a timeless and individual look.

Source of inspirational images (clockwise from top left): By Thornam, Hotel Henriette, Clickon Furniture, Cappadocia collection, Sarah Sherman Samuel

Regardless of the direction you take, what’s exciting about this year’s trends is the flexibility to mix and adapt them to fit your ever changing style over time. This is how we take “less is more” and simply make it feel like a whole lot more.

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